About-Entering-2D-Cartesian-Coordinates

About Entering 2D Cartesian Coordinates

About Entering 2D Cartesian Coordinates

You can use absolute or relative Cartesian (rectangular) coordinates to locate points
when creating objects.

To use Cartesian coordinates to specify a point, enter an X value and a Y value separated by a comma. The X value is the positive or negative distance, in units, along the horizontal axis.
The Y value is the positive or negative distance, in units, along the vertical axis.

Absolute Coordinates

Absolute coordinates are based on the UCS origin (0,0), which is the intersection
of the X and Y axes. Use absolute coordinates when you know the precise X and Y values of the point.

With dynamic input, you specify absolute coordinates with the # prefix. If you enter coordinates on the command line instead of in the tooltip, the
# prefix is not used. For example, entering #3,4 specifies a point 3 units along the X axis and 4 units along the Y axis from the UCS origin.

The following example draws a line beginning at an X value of -2, a Y value of 1, and an endpoint at 3,4. Enter the following in the tooltip:

Command: line

From point: #-2,1

To point: #3,4

The line is located as follows:

Relative Coordinates

Relative coordinates are based on the last point entered. Use relative coordinates
when you know the location of a point in relation to the previous point.

To specify relative coordinates, precede the coordinate values with an @ sign. For
example, entering @3,4 specifies a point 3 units along the X axis and 4 units along the Y axis from the last point specified.

The following example draws the sides of a triangle. The first side is a line starting
at the absolute coordinates -2,1 and ending at a point 5 units in the X direction and 0 units in the Y direction. The second side is a line starting at the endpoint of the first line and
ending at a point 0 units in the X direction and 3 units in the Y direction. The final line segment uses relative coordinates to return to the starting
point.

Command: line

From point: #-2,1

To point: @5,0

To point: @0,3

To point: @-5,-3

Learning AutoCad

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